The tradition of the goddess Fortuna in Roman literature and in the transitional period
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The tradition of the goddess Fortuna in Roman literature and in the transitional period by Howard Rollin Patch

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Published by Norwood Editions in Norwood, Pa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fortuna (Roman deity)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Howard Rollin Patch.
SeriesSmith College studies in modern languages ;, v. 3, no. 3.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBL820.F7 P37 1977
The Physical Object
Pagination177 p. ;
Number of Pages177
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4546558M
ISBN 100848221648
LC Control Number77014390
OCLC/WorldCa3274021

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  Bibliography: p. The tradition of the goddess Fortuna in Roman literature and in the transitional periodPages: The tradition of the goddess Fortuna in Roman literature and in the transitional period Volume 3 - Scholar's Choice Edition [Patch, Howard Rollin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The tradition of the goddess Fortuna in Roman literature and in the transitional period Volume 3 - Scholar's Choice Edition5/5(1). The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period (Classic Reprint) [Howard Rollin Patch] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Excerpt from The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period The purpose of this essay is to study the nature and functions of the Goddess of Fortune in Roman literature and. P. [1], in Roman literature and in the transitional period --pt. [2], in medieval philosophy and literature. Series Title: Smith College studies in modern languages, v. 3, no. 3.

The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna In Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period Introduction The purpose of this essay is to study the nature and functions of the Goddess of Fortune in Roman literature and the literature of the transitional period.^ The frequent appearance of this figure in documents of the Middle Ages is well-known. Excerpt from The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional PeriodThe purpose of this essay is to study the nature and functions of the Goddess of Fortune in Roman literature and the literature of the transitional period.1 The frequent appearance of this figure in documents of the Middle Ages is well known, although, perhaps, not adequatelExcerpt from The /5(). The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period Volume 3 - Primary Source Edition: Howard Rollin Patch: Books - 5/5(1). Publishing platform for digital magazines, interactive publications and online catalogs. Convert documents to beautiful publications and share them worldwide. Title: “The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna: In Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period; In Medieval Philosophy and Literature” and “Fortuna in Old French Literature", Author: Cappelli, Length: pages, Published:

The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period Volume 3 - Scholar's Choice Edition by Howard Rollin Patch avg rating — 0 ratings. Fortuna, in Roman religion, goddess of chance or lot who became identified with the Greek Tyche; the original Italian deity was probably regarded as the bearer of prosperity and such she resembles a fertility deity, hence her association with the bounty of the soil and the fruitfulness of women. Frequently she was an oracular goddess consulted in various ways regarding the future. Goddess Fortuna in literature (and art) from classical times to the Renaissance. From the standpoint of the scholar, it is supplemented by his earlier contributions to the Smith College Studies in Modern Languages, "The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Roman Literature and in the Transitional Period". Fortuna (Latin: Fortūna, equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the goddess of fortune and the personification of luck in Roman religion who, largely thanks to the Late Antique author Boethius, remained popular through the Middle Ages until at least the Renaissance.. Fortuna is often depicted with a gubernaculum (ship's rudder), a ball or Rota Fortunae (wheel of fortune, first mentioned Abode: Rome.